Friday, 14 September 2018

And we're off level 1 and 2 City and Guilds 7161 Hand and Machine Embroidery.



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Busy Bees Patchwork
City and Guilds Hand and Machine Embroidery
7161
Tutor - Beccy Paget

Wonderful news, the registration date for this course has been extended to 2021

Since I spoke to you last, City and Guilds have extended their registration date to December 2021, which means that this wonderful qualification will continue for the next 3 years in it's present form.  A diverse and comprehensive course that teaches you how to turn your creative thoughts into reality.  The course is accredited which means that you will gain a qualification that is known and respected in the industry the whole world over.

There are not many places now in the Uk and certainly not Wales where you can take this course and I feel as a tutor very privileged to deliver this course to you through my Business who I run with my partner Ann Stuart here at Busy Bees Patchwork in the beautiful grounds of the National Trust property of Tredegar House Newport South Wales.


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Ann is on the left and I'm on the right, we run a happy ship, but take our work very seriously,
both of us have had many years experience in the trade but opportunity knocked for both of us in 2014 having not even met each other, we hit it off straight away and have not looked back since!
We keep each other on an even keel and sometimes I wonder how we manage it all, as both of us have such creative minds, but each has their roles to play and we have only to look forward now and grow our business into a center of learning excellence for textile lovers. We offer many courses through our shop, day classes and weekly classs some we teach ourselves and others by talented local and international tutors. Needless to say we are very proud to be an accredited center for City and Guilds, so if you are still thinking of doing this course then there is still time to join in, I am a very giving and generous tutor and will help you to catch up if you decide to take the plunge!!!




The new roundabout layout at Junction 28 is nearing completion and is a big improvement on the old roundabout.  Follow the A48  Cardiff road west to the traffic lights and turn left onto Pencarn road, at the roundabout take the first exit and you will arrive at the car park for Tredegar House. Busy Bees shop is located in the row of craft shops in the car park.




We run some of our smaller workshops in the shop itself but we also have a studio where we run larger workshops such as the City and Guilds courses. The studio has all the facilities you would expect plus great disabled access for wheelchair users and disabled toilet facilities too.
To get to our studio from the M4, follow the A48, Cardiff road west towards Tredegar House at the traffic lights turn left onto Pencarn road. Take the second exit on the roundabout and continue to the next roundabout. Take the second exit and travel about a quarter of mile and take the next left Tredegar house drive. Follow this road until you come to a dead end, drive to the right and you will see a news agents, you can park here and walk or you can drive through the metal gates and park directly outside Busy Bees Studio, perfect when you have lots of equipment to bring to class like heavy sewing machines.




Our first meeting of the year for those returning to level 2 and our new level 1's went very well yesterday! Level 2 girls have had a little rest over the summer and are raring to see what level 2 has to offer and those taking part for the first time are probably wondering what on earth they have let themselves in for, but all is calm in the studio after the initial hello's and greetings and we're off to a good start!


Level 2's task this week was thread sketching or making marks with thread and needle instead of pencil and paint. Using only a couple of stitches straight and chain I have asked them to draw a 2 inch square and to fill that square with a stitch, using all kinds of threads and yarns. To layer, distort and generally use the stitches in a completely random way, totally against the grain when you are so used to certain stitches looking or having a function that are not normally for.

Straight stitching for many is a utility stitch, a stitch which holds seams together or if you are a quilter it is used to hold the layers together in a quilt generally in linear form, You also see it on the outside of garments, on jeans pockets or around a collar. In embroidery the use of straight stitch can be seen in many forms, in Kantha work, Japanese sashiko work, quilting and others but if you break it down in to single random elements it becomes a seeding stitch. The act of taking the needle through the back of the fabric to the top and then placing the needle at a new point on the top of the material and then through the back is I suppose a straight stitch. How you combine them from there on is what makes the difference. Also the type of thread and fabric you stitch into also gives this, the most basic of stitches it's appeal. From time and memorial this utilitarian stitch has featured in nearly everything we make from those who first sewed with bone needles to the very latest computerised machine we just love this stitch. No matter who you are, everyone appreciates it's qualities, top fashion designers to fisherman, builders to sailors if you look that straight stitch is in every garment we wear, and it hasn't changed much from when it was first invented way back when!

I have often joked that I could teach a whole day on just straight stitching, but the more I think about it would/could take a week to review the qualities of this fundamental part of our lives.
The chain stitch not to be undermined has also a long history, and perhaps some of you will know this but I am assuming that many don't, that the first mechanical sewing machines invented made a chain stitch and you still see it today on tops of potato bags, carrot sacks and other feeds that come in hessian or net bags. the advantage of this stitch for the industry is that it comes undone very easily if you cut the right end and locks when you don't. A very strong stitch when locked but for garment making as you can imagine not really suitable, seams would be unraveling all over the place and that would not be a good thing at all !!! There are still some domestic machines that do a chain stitch and that is the cover stitch machines that look like an overlocker/serger, also those very cheep hand held machines which break almost when you take them out of the box.
A different story for the embroiderer the chain stitch is held in quite high regard and if you are of a certain age one of the first stitches you would have been taught at school. I remember using chain stitch for a snail shell and trying ever so hard to make the stitches as neat and as uniform as I could to impress my teacher. Although she was impressed, my hard efforts were dashed when I had to unpick all my work as I had stitched it to my skirt as well :( (no laughing please I was bereft) I don't know how much that day affected me, but to this day I detest unpicking anything and do my level best not to.  My friend said to me once, you never make any mistakes well I believe in preparation and then I find I don't have to unpick, I am bit like a tortoise slow and steady wins the race!

Here are a few samples of some stitching the ladies did, taking these two lovable stitches out of context and layering them, distorting them and using all sorts of threads too.


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I am interested to see what they come up with next week!


Level 1 ladies were set quite a different task of mark making with pencils and marking pens, a little lesson in how different the pencil can make marks when held in a different way eg. at the top, in the middle and near the tip. The amount of pressure and control is very different and consequently makes either light or bold marks on the paper. Using different hardness of pencil again creates unique marks either fine with a very had pencil such as a 4H or thick with a 4B pencil. Did you know that on the graphite scale H stands for hardness and B stands for blackness, well now you do!
Making marks in a random way is very satisfying long, short, dots, all these elements go towards your first lesson in drawing. Horizontal lines, vertical lines and curved lines indicate direction in your design even if they are broken. They help to travel your eye around a picture and lead you to the most important features, the basis of any good picture. Although some students struggle with this part of the process because it seems too simplistic it is good to strip back to the basics to see your design in it's simplest form. Later when choosing a subject to depict in stitches, it is impossible to put in every detail and we need to lose some of the peripheral elements and pair back so that the main parts are shown. It is surprising how our eyes fill in the rest.

Lines are everywhere in our daily lives, learn to look around you and see from where you are sat how many lines you can see! Edge of curtain, the curtain pole or rail, on a t shirt or a garment your wearing, doors, walls, wallpaper every where you look horizontal, vertical and curved lines.  They have been used in decoration in different ways since forever!


As we progress the ladies will become more aware of line and how to appreciate it's in importance in design not only the visual lines we can see but the also the suggested line in a picture that helps the viewer to keep focused on the subject.

I think that's enough for this week, I hope they are doing some homework and next week I'll bring you some more pictures of what they're up to. For myself I 'm still working on my miners, I haven't had a great deal of free time but that's how it goes sometimes.

Best stitches
Beccy








Wednesday, 5 September 2018

Long time, no blog! City and Guilds 7161 Hand and Machine Embroidery Beccy Paget Busy Bees Patchwork


Busy Bees Patchwork
City and Guilds Hand and Machine Embroidery
7161
Beccy Paget

Long time, no blog!

Well the summer holidays are over, we've had some wonderful weather quite like old times. I remember wonderful summers as a child, I lived in a beautiful country cottage on the side of a huge Pine forest with a view to die for looking across the Usk valley towards Christchurch and Caerleon. It was idyllic when I look back, my sister and I used to make den's in the forest and ride our bikes and on rainy days we'd make tents out of blankets on the settee and watch telly by the fire. 
My parents were always busy so I was glad to have my sister for company but she was 3 years older than me and boy did she assert her authority she was definitely the Boss but I didn't mind she had the most wonderful way of telling stories and I could have listened to her for hours. I have two older sisters who at the time lived at home, it was a squeeze but we all rubbed together along well. My mother would never allow us argue and we were never allowed upstairs in the day, sometimes I wonder how we all managed in that little cottage on the hill. 

 No one in my family sews, I can remember begging my mum to show me how to use her new sewing machine when she part exchanged my grand mothers old singer (oh how I wish I had that now !) A singer starlet sat behind the sofa for so long I don't think my Mum ever threaded it up. But her talents laid elsewhere, she was an amazing cook and she was a wonderful writer of letters. In fact it was my Mum's letter that got me my job working with sewing machines when I was 22.
That singer starlet bless it's little heart never really had any use and I asked my mum if I could part exchange for a newer model where I worked, from there my passion for machines started. Learning how to use all the different models in the shop was an absolute joy,  all their different abilities the higher in price they went, you soon learned why paying that little extra could make your sewing project that little bit easier, you can guess what happened to my little Newhome machine, well it was part exchanged for a reconditioned Newhome 7500 and to me all singing all dancing I thought I was the bees knees. (Little did I know!!) Let's say it didn't end there but hey ho I loved my sewing and with no family at that time my money was my own.

I have to say over the holidays I haven't done a great deal of sewing because my sewing room was so untidy and over flowing it really put me off, so I decided enough was enough and I donned my Apron and began painting the spare room (which my big son vacated in march), ordered a big unit from Ikea and lots of storage boxes, I ordered some kitchen drawer units and spent a whole afternoon in the bedroom with my husband :) putting together this blessed unit, lets say the air was blue he has no patience for flat pack at all !!!!!!! It took at least 2 hours and there's only another 7 to go, well not in this room, the other 7 are going in the new art room downstairs I'm feeling very lucky and blessed at the moment to be able to separate the sewing from the art. I think I'm going to have to call on my son or son-in-law to put up the rest.




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Behind this door is such a mess I would be ashamed to show you, but I will keep you up to date with what happens as work progresses. I have moved a lot and found to my horror the biggest spider in the world hiding behind my sewing machine which set me back a few days because my husband won't let me kill them, so I had to pluck up the courage knowing that he was there to decant all my sewing stuff to the new room up stairs. He's still there but as long as I can't see him i'm okay! and any way I couldn't harm him because he's hiding behind the existing units :(

In contrast the new sewing room is taking shape and looking super dooper if I say so myself.


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I can't wait until it's all done, but I have to be patient and it will get there and then I hope to be more organised between my time in the sewing room, the art room and hand sewing at the dining room table. You may think my goodness does this woman do anything else but sew and paint? Well yes but when you teach City and Guilds in hand and machine embroidery you need a good space to store and practice new techniques. I'm always trying out something to show the students and keep everything from thread waste to empty cereal packets and for those things, which you think, might just come in handy and that is how the other room got into such a pickle.

We start back in earnest next Wednesday and I am really looking forward to last years ladies moving on to year 2 and the new learners for level 1. Level 2's will be learning more about shape, pattern, form and beginning to put a portfolio together to make an item for a commission. Level 1's will be  starting with mark making  and basic drawing skills.

For myself among everything else I have decided to give myself a project or a theme and I was shopping in Abergavenny market a few months ago and a stall holder was selling leather pieces and I'm not sure why but into my creative mind popped coal faces and miners, the leather looked for all the will in the world like a coal face and of course I bought it and there it has been sat for quite some time as I mull over what to do with it. There is my inspiration and it may get used and it may not but it has set the ball rolling and so I will spend some time drawing, sketching, painting and deciding what I would like to make a hanging, a sculpture, a picture maybe all three it depends on how I feel about it. I have family connections with the mines so I feel a connection with the subject already. I have made some sketches from pictures I have found on the internet from old photographs.




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I was quite pleased with these seeing as I haven't done a lot drawing for a while, but I think when you connect with a subject it always feels better. I am now working on some stitching samples in hand quilting and machine applique. I also want to experiment with some surface fabric treatment. I will let you know how I am getting on as the weeks go by. It may not come together quickly but it will be an ongoing project.

Hope you will join us on this year's journey into hand and machine stitched textiles, let me know if any of the work has inspired you and thank you for reading my blog.

Best stitches 

Beccy



Monday, 2 July 2018

Busy Bees Patchwork Workshop Programme Launch 2018/2019


The new Busy Bees Patchwork workshop programme will be out soon!
Saturday 21st July 2018


We have an exciting array of classes to suit all abilities in Patchwork, quilting, mixed media, hand embroidery and much more! 

We pride ourselves on finding the very best of local talented tutors to inspire, and help further your creative knowledge without being too expensive! Many of our tutors have been teaching for many years, but we also like to help those who are new to teaching and give them a chance to show what they can do and also inspire them on their journey as teachers too!

Everyone knows how therapeutic making and crafting is, it's also about community and making new friends. It's about being with others who understand how important it is to be creative, we love to purchase our goodies, sit and admire them, plan the next project and generally drool over the lovely fabrics, threads, papers and mixed media products that are out there today. So much at our fingertips but then comes what do i do with them? A class (like no other), a good teacher can help you on your way, and hopefully even complete a project in a day where time allows. Being part of that community of people feels rewarding, our happy place where nothing else in the world matters, you can let your worries fly out the window for a short while and only concentrate on making something beautiful.
It's a feel good thing, putting your brain to good use, we can loose ourselves and dream of what we will attempt next, invisage what it will be like, what fabrics to use, what threads and who will benefit from your craft. A present for Grandma, a gift for the new baby in the family, a big smile on your sisters face when she knows how much love and effort it must have took to make such a wonderful gift. All this and more comes from being creative and taking a class with others means you can share and inspire your fellow class mates, it's like belonging to a secret society.

This year we are thrilled to have Parr's Rulers demonstrating for us on the day, their innovation to help you quilt is being recognised the world over! They have recently teamed up with Create and Craft and had very successful show some weeks ago. They have also agreed to teach for us in the new programme, so if you have purchased rulers and would like some extra tuition, book onto their class and learn how to be more confident in using this amazing system.
I know I am going to have a go for sure!

Looking forward to seeing you on the day, the city and Guilds girls have nearly completed all they need to do for level 1 and will be exhibiting their work for you to see and admire, they have worked so hard as have the Patchwork girls too!

Pop along and see us you can't fail to be inspired by all the lovely work that will be on display.
What will you learn this year at the "Hive of Inspiration"

Best stitches
Beccy x


P.S  Now taking names for level 1 City and Guilds 7161 textiles hand and machine embroidery.  





Wednesday, 20 June 2018

Busy Bees Patchwork

Your centre for City and Guilds Textiles and Patchwork
in South Wales

City and Guilds Level 1 Certificate in Textiles 7161

My word!!!! is it really so long ago since my last blog on the 23rd May, where does the time go. Being busy that's where it goes, I bet you thought we'd fallen off the edge of the world, well not quite. Just coming to the end of a fantastic year of creativity, the ladies have nearly finished all they need to do and now I have the daunting task of marking and giving out their final results for the year. I have not been looking forward to this at all! Although I have to say the standard throughout this year has been remarkable and they should all be very pleased with what they have achieved over the 36 weeks we have been together. 

I will say that it has been the most enjoyable year for me, my first year of teaching an accredited course has given me so much pleasure and I am thrilled that all the ladies have expressed an interest to join me next year for level 2, so I couldn't have been that much of a slave driver as they lead me to believe. The ladies will be exhibiting their work at the Busy Bees Programme launch on Saturday 21st July 2018, so if you have an idea that you might like to take part in this year's level 1, starting in September 2018 then this would be the perfect opportunity to come along and chat to me and the ladies, see the work they have produced and be inspired by their creativity. It is a lot of hard work but so rewarding as you will see from the wonderful pieces they have stitched.

I'm afraid I don't have many pictures to show you this week as we have been getting to grips with finishing off loose ends, labelling and cross referencing written work, so that when the lady from EQA lady comes from City and Guilds we will be on track and ready to have the results verified. But we did have a little play the week before last with colouring fabric with wax crayons. Something I have never really explored much, and I have to say I was quite taken with it. 
The best attribute for colouring with wax crayons is that the fabric stays soft, using acrylic paint makes the fabric hard and difficult to hand sew into, markals take a while
to dry thoroughly and leaves a strong smell of oil and water colour is difficult to control without a fabric medium, but using wax you can easily control where the colour goes and stays and can be blended to build up the colours to give a lovely shading effect.
We tried two methods, one where you melt the wax and apply with a soft cloth or kitchen towel and the other is applying the wax direct to the fabric and then use baby oil to blend the wax using a cotton wool bud. These techniques work equally well on paper and can then be used to colour sketch book pages, also because it is wax it will act as a resist to water colour paints.

Below are a few pictures of the girls first attempts!


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The crayons also give a lovely soft effect, above Sonia took a rubbing from the side of a set of carved wooden shelves and then used the baby oil to soften and blend the rubbing.

The only draw back I think is that the fabric needs to be held down firmly and we tried several ways of doing this, one ironing on freezer paper to the reverse of the fabric a temporary measure that worked quite well. Iron on medium interfacing, again worked well but the interfacing would be a more permanent fixture, good for book covers and the like. Iron on a piece of bondaweb and then it would be great for applique projects. I also tried my sticky mat from my Silhoette cutting machine and that also worked well to hold the fabric in place. A few methods to try if you want to keep the fabric still while drawing or colouring soft fabrics that easily move around.


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Ann went home and worked this beautiful piece with butterflies, she used bondaweb on some of the butterflies and only secured half down so that the butter fly wings are
proud of the fabric which makes them look like they are going to take flight.

Like all things, it takes time to play and develop better methods of approaching different techniques, an extra day a week should cover it please!!!!!

Last weeks session was using the sewing machine and free motion stitching to make a bowl from thread and fabric scraps sandwiched between two pieces of soft water soluble fabric. We put this into a hoop, because it is not easy to handle without one. Learning little things like this can be the starting point for so many other projects, from a simple technique you can embellish further with hand sewing or stitching on beads or making larger panels for bigger bowls, so many options when you put your mind to it.
I will post next week some of the results for making the bowls.

I think that's all for this week and because we are winding down, I won't be blogging after the end of july, a little rest for the summer holibobs and then it will be back to it and hopefully a full level1 class and level 2's as well in September.
Hope all well with everyone, if you want to chat to me about the City and Guilds class give me a call on 01633 810801 (Tuesday to Saturday) or email me on
beccy@busybeespatchwork.com
Best stitches
Beccyx

Friday, 25 May 2018

Busy Bees Patchwork

Your centre for City and Guilds Textiles and Patchwork
in South Wales

 Week 30 City and Guilds Level 1 Certificate in Textiles 7161

Machine Applique and reverse applique
May 23rd 2018

Last week I wrote about machine applique using bondaweb, applying shapes to the right side of the fabric and how to adjust your machine to make the classic satin stitch using the zigzag setting and altering width and length accordingly. 
Reverse applique however, is a style of applique that is sewn with a straight stitch from the wrong side which holds the applique shape in place instead of using bondaweb. Bondaweb can sometimes be too firm for the fabrics, okay if you need that stability, but when you want a softer finish it may not be suitable. There are other bonding sheets such as misty fuse which is much softer and finer, but again you may not have all of these products in your stash!

Below are some diagrams of how to apply fabrics from the reverse, there are other variations of this method but this is my method of choice.




Once all the parts of the applique are in place, detail can then be added with satin stitch or decorative stitches on the machine if you have them. 
Very detailed designs can be applied in this way, just be careful of the order in which the fabrics are applied, stitch and tear can be applied to the reverse when using the satin stitch to avoid puckering.

Now to some photos of the ladies work from today and the past couple of weeks.


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Some lovely colours being worked here, Purple and lime greens my favourite combination!


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Popular colour palette!

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We're getting there, week by week machine skills are improving, I'm determined they will one day love machine stitching as much as hand stitching!!!!



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A couple of weeks ago when we were experimenting with markal paintstiks I gave the ladies a challenge of using different types of materials to work on and how to think of them in a more abstract way. Below Kay has taken some Aida and stencilled Markals in triangular shapes, she has distressed the canvas and used large bold stitching to rejoin the canvas threads. I think this sample has quite a powerful statement to make even in such a small sample.
Order and Chaos comes straight to mind!  



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You would never guess what Kay used here in this little sample, but I am going to tell you because you'll be straight down to your nearest DIY shop and giving it a go. Blown Vinyl wall paper. Yes, painted with markals and stitched to a stencilled background. I love the way she has used these textured papers in her sample and could really see a bigger piece with these techniques included. City and Guilds really does help you to see the world around you in a different way, stretches our imagination and brings out the very best in us. Well done Kay!


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Celia brought in some fabulous embroidered panels for us to drool over. The piece below is called Mola work. Kuna women from the San Blas Archipelago produce most of the work, though some molas are also made by Kuna women from inland Panama and Western Columbia. The designs as with most embroidery have symbolic meanings and stem from necessity rather than for design sake. The work is so finely worked and is a form of reverse applique.



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The piece below originates from China, and is so beautifully stitched. Sometimes it difficult to believe that these were made by human hand and not by machine the stitching is so fine.  

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Beautiful and inspiring work from the other sides of the world, and yet our passion is just as strong as theirs. Embroidery has appeal the world throughout, a true common thread to decorate and make our lives better through art and design. Yet with textiles there is that added softness and comfort that using fabric brings.

No blog next week we are on half term!
Best stitches 
Beccy

Don't forget do something creative this week! 

Friday, 18 May 2018

Busy Bees Patchwork

Your centre for City and Guilds Textiles and Patchwork
in South Wales

 Week 29 City and Guilds Level 1 Certificate in Textiles 7161

Machine Applique and reverse applique
May 18th 2018

It has been a busy few weeks here at Busy Bees and the reason I haven't blogged for a while.
The ladies have been very busy catching up with work as we head towards the last few weeks of Level 1, I can't believe how quickly this time has passed and so much wonderful work has been produced, I am really looking forward to the exhibition on our workshop programme open day on Saturday 21st July 2018.

This week and next week we are covering machine applique and reverse applique. Two very exciting techniques that are probably the most used techniques when it comes to textile art. Applique meaning to apply one fabric to another in a decorative way either by applying a shape such as a flower or bird.
Most people when thinking about machine applique will be familiar with the words satin stitch, a close zigzag that firmly holds the shape to be applied in place. To achieve this stitch on your machine as long as it has a swing needle (not a straight stitch machine) you will need to be able to alter the length and width settings to achieve this decorative stitch. Not all machines are able to do this so check your manual first to make sure. The general settings for most machines is to set the pattern dial or from the digital display select the zigzag pattern and then adjust the  length 0.5 or close to 0 but not too close because setting the machine to 0 tells the feed dog to sew on the spot, but you need to be fairly close in order for the stitches to sit side by side. Always test first on a scrap of fabric and if the foot moves freely and the stitches are close then you have found the right setting. To set the zigzag either change the numbers to 3.0 or 3.5 or turn your pattern dial so that the bars are set just above the middle position. Most mechanical machines have a width maximum of 5 which relates in size to 5 mm. A computerised machine generally will have a setting of 7 mm.







Always test your settings because things can change when using thicker threads or fine threads, or thicker fabrics etc. Applique is such a useful technique to learn, you can be so creative with it, from your choice of design through to your choice of fabrics and threads.  It can be intricate in pattern or cover large areas the possibilities are endless!

Before the invention of wonderful Bondaweb, (a sheet of glue attached to a carrier sheet that bonds through heat application) applying shapes, especially small shapes would take a considerable amount of time and skill. Bondaweb a brand name for this mesh of glue, securely holds the shape in place while stitching, it also prevents fraying on fabrics of that nature so applying any type of fabric now need not cause too much concern. The carrier sheet resembles tracing paper and the design can be traced onto this cut out roughly around the shape and then bond to the reverse or wrong side of the fabric to be applied. Cut out the shape when attached to the fabric, peel away the paper and then place onto the background fabric right side up and iron into place with a medium to hot iron, making sure the glue on the reverse is well and truly adhered to the background.
When you have applied your shape, with machine set correctly and the satin stitch foot on the machine continue to sew around your design making sure that when the needle of the machine falls into to left position that it passes through the applique and the background and that the right fall of the needle only goes through the background material. Covering the raw edges of the applique shape. 
When it is time to turn or work your way around a curve if turning clockwise, leave the needle in the fabric on the right fall and pivot back into position rather than dragging the fabric around, this will cause the material to pucker! If your turning anti clockwise then leave the needle in the left fall and pivot for that direction. If you find the material is puckering you can also place a piece of stitch and tear interfacing to the reverse to give more substance to that area. Satin stitch has a tendency to pucker the material especially fine fabrics because of the concentration of stitches, changing the tension to a lower setting can also help with this problem, again testing first will throw up these problems so that when you approach your finished work all problems should be ironed out.

I might go on a bit about testing but unless you give the machine a chance to do a good job by adjusting this and that, then you cannot expect it to know exactly what you want. Too often we blame the poor old machine, but in fact we just haven't given it the right foot, the right needle, the right settings etc to do the job! In industry machines are set up with one job to do eg putting in a zip on denim fabric with a size 50 thread and 100 standard needle, it will do that all day long with no problem at all,  now think how it would fare without changing those settings and ask it sew silk chiffon?  Food for thought ......

Next week I'll explain a little about reverse applique and how it can help apply fabrics in a more intricate way.  Here are some pictures of what the ladies have been up to recently, not so many now as pieces are being finished and we only have a few more techniques to cover.

Some samples of transfer painting. 

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Stencilled with Markals 

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Trying out Markals on different surfaces including sticky back plastic, scrim, and lutradur.

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Stencils with Markals

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Rubbings with Markals from Indian block prints

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Below, a rubbing with markals from a Garden seat no less !!!

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Inspiration is all around us even where we sit! Keep your eyes and mind open and you will be surprised what comes to mind when looking at an object in a different way.  Celia had some old keys and they have come to tell a story about the suffragettes and the emancipation of women. The key in her piece is a representation of the women who chained themselves to railings to fight for the cause, a key was needed to release them from their chains physically and metaphorically! It will be quite a profound piece when finished.



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Well I think that's enough for this week, hope you find some time to stitch this week or maybe start a sketchbook of ideas, jot down some ideas or little drawings and scribbles see what come to mind.
Enjoy the sunshine while it's here too!

Best stitches
Beccy
  

Wednesday, 2 May 2018

Week 27 Discovering the beauty of Markal Paintstiks Level 1 City and Guilds Textiles @Busy Bees Patchwork Studio

Busy Bees Patchwork

Your centre for City and Guilds Textiles and Patchwork
in South Wales

 Week 27 City and Guilds Level 1 Certificate in Textiles 7161

Markal Painstiks

May 2nd 2018

First let me apologise for the absence of last weeks blog! We had such a busy session learning about transfer dyes and how to use them by the time I looked at the clock it was time to go home and no time to take pictures. I thought perhaps a blog with no pictures would be pretty boring so I decided not to and make up for it this week.
Although our sessions are 3 hours, time just seems to fly! and yet most people feel that their best work is done at home in the comfort of their own surroundings, where you can take time to think over the process or technique and tailor it to your own design.
We all work in different ways and I always found that I loved going to class, meeting up with my fellow learners, learning the technique for the week and then going home to put that new found knowledge into practice. Meeting up with my fellow enthusiasts gave me a boost, seeing how others approached the same task, mulling over the different fabrics, threads and paints, listening to other ideas and points of view to me was a very important part of the whole journey.
Unlike school I hated missing weeks because of half term, but I suppose my teacher deserved a break but I really missed going to class. Although going to class was the best thing, I could never produce any thing I was happy with in those few hours, my best efforts were always at home in my little sewing room, crammed to the ceiling with all my lovely stuff around me like a bird in a nest! I guess we all work in different ways and some people prefer distance learning and some may not have the luxury of having a centre close by to attend but for me, the camaraderie of class mates really makes the whole experience of learning extra special!

This week we are discovering what effects we can gain from using Markal Paintstiks.
In essence these are oil paints in a crayon form. When you first use them from the packet you have to remove the outer dry skin which forms naturally when the paint is dry. These little bits of dry oil paint can be collected and melted between two sheets of baking parchment to form random splodges of paint or you can blend them with a stencil brush.
Once the dry outer casing is removed you then use the sticks to make rubbings onto paper or fabric. The colours are very solid, not very vibrant but they do look great on a dark fabric or paper, because they are opaque. Dark fabrics are notorioulsy poor for printing on because the ink sinks into the fabric but the Markals seem to sit on the fabric surface and adhere like glue. Within 48 hours the paint is cured or dried and is then permanent and water proof!


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They come in a huge variety of colours, and
unlike other paints they last for years, because
they have this self sealing habit, so when
you remove the skin they are ready to go!
The solid colours can be mixed like other paints
so yellow and blue will make green and so on! 





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They also make an iridescent oil stick,
these are really super and leave a beautiful
shimmer. They can be mixed with the solid
colours too!
If you like a little bling or a subtle shine, these
paints are really fantastic!

Both Paintsticks work well on any fabric type,
once dry they are soft to stitch into and are
permanent and water proof.



They are a considered purchase, but a little paint goes a very long way!
They are definitely worth a try, don't be disappointed with your first attempt, because most techniques need to be tried more than once. Quite often we want something to work first time but unfortunately to get the best out of any skill it needs to be attempted more than once. Can you remember learning how to write as a child, or learning to drive or getting to grips with your first job, we only get better at something when we do it over and over again. That's why I am giving the ladies another week next week to appreciate the paints a little more. There are so many techniques to learn whilst on the City and Guilds course there never seems to be enough time to really explore certain techniques to the full. Hopefully they will use these paints more in Level 2 !


Here are some of the results of our time together today!


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Already I can see some wonderful works or art in the making, the one just about is just gorgeous! This could be used as a background for stitching into or if a shape cut from the fabric it could be appliqued as a sea turtle's shell or butterfly wings. 

I am sure next week with a little time to themselves they will come up with some amazing ideas. The best results from today's experiments probably came from the rubbings taken from blown vinyl wall paper.  It comes nowadays in so many great patterns to make rubbings from but also when we applied the oil paint to it, it was thought that perhaps we could even use the wall paper to stitch into and I am hoping someone will have a go, because I am definitely going to have a go when I get some spare time.

Everyone was impressed with using stencils and a stencil brush, the bristles of a stencil brush are shorter and flat at the top, the paint is applied to the fabric or paper by either stippling or swirling.  Stippling gives a speckled effect and swirling gives a lovely blended effect, the paints can be blended to give a lovely depth of colour. Further paint layers can be applied to give a more solid colour.

I think I have covered everything we have done today and if you have bought these in the past from shows I hope this blog inspires you to get them out of the bottom draw and have a go. Find some stencils, wood block stamps or even take a rubbing from the living room wall paper or better still, pop down to your local DIY store for some samples and see what you come up with, feel free to post them on our facebook page I'd loved to see how you get on.

Here are some results from last weeks session on transfer dyes, another week of playing and look what they have come up with!

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It's always difficult to learn a new technique, getting your head around something you are not used to is very demanding but I think these are just stunning for just 2 weeks trial.  These may not end up as embroideries but future projects will certainly be inspired by them I am sure.

That's all for this week I hope you will have time to be creative and maybe get out those transfer paints or Markals and give them a go.

Level 1 is nearly coming to an end, if you are interested in applying for Level 1 I am taking names now for September 2018. I only have 10 places available and already have 4 people interested so give me a call at the shop to register your interest. We have our exhibition coming up on the 21st July at Duffryn Community Centre, Newport, South Wales, you will be able to see the girls work in the flesh and chat to them about the course as well as me.

Take care and speak to you soon!
Best stitches
Beccy x